Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Plan (DAAPP)

Standards of Conduct

Sanctions

Counseling, Treatment and Rehabilitation Programs

Health Risks

DAAPP Statement

Dominican University students experience an environment that encourages intellectual growth through free inquiry. We recognize that freedom to teach and learn depends upon truthful and caring conditions in the classroom, on the campus and in the larger community. The maintenance of the traditions of truth and caring demands a high standard of respect for the rights and dignity of others and for adherence to the necessary policies established to give order to our daily lives. Dominican University expects responsible social conduct of students, which reflects well on themselves and the university.

Dominican University is committed to fostering a campus environment that is conducive to academic inquiry, productive campus life, thoughtful study and discourse. A community exists on the basis of shared values and principles. At Dominican University, student members of the community are expected to uphold and abide by the standards of conduct that form the basis of the Student Code of Conduct. These standards are embodied within a set of core values that include integrity, social justice, respect, community and responsibility. When members of the community fail to exemplify these values, campus conduct proceedings are used to assert and uphold the Student Code of Conduct.

Ultimately, each member of the Dominican University community is expected to assume responsibility for their conduct and to assume reasonable responsibility for the behavior of others. On occasion, this may involve bystander intervention when one member observes another in inappropriate conduct. At other times it will involve cooperation when the authorities are investigating instances of alleged misconduct.

The Student Code of Conduct is committed to an educational and developmental process that balances the interests of individual students with the interests of the University community. The student conduct process at Dominican University is not intended to punish students. Rather, it exists to protect the interests of the community and to challenge those whose behavior is not in accordance with our standards. Sanctions are intended to challenge students’ moral and ethical decision-making and to help them bring their behavior into accord with our community expectations. When a student is unable to conform their behavior to community expectations, the student conduct process may determine that they should no longer share in the privilege of participating in this community.

Students should be aware that the student conduct process is quite different from criminal and civil court proceedings. Procedures and rights in student conduct proceedings are conducted with fairness to all, but do not include the same protections of due process afforded by the courts. Fair process, within these procedures, assures written notice and a hearing before an objective decision is made. It assures that no student will be found in violation of university policy without information showing that it is more likely than not that a policy violation occurred, and that any sanction will be proportionate to the severity of the violation and to the cumulative conduct history of the student.

Standards of Behavior
In accordance with the university motto Caritas et Veritas, compassion and truth, Dominican University has developed standards of behavior in support of the intellectual, physical, spiritual and emotional development of each student.
Integrity
Dominican University students exemplify honesty, honor and a respect for truth in all of their dealings.
Community
Dominican University students build, enhance and value their community.
Social Justice
Dominican University students are just and equitable in their treatment of all members of the community and act to discourage and/or intervene to prevent unjust and inequitable behaviors.
Respect
Dominican University students show positive regard for self, each other, for property, and for the community.
Responsibility
Dominican University students are given and accept a high level of responsibility to self, to others and to the community.

All students are sent the Student Handbook and Code of Conduct on an annual basis. It is understood that those who enroll in the university accept the terms and conditions stated in the Student Handbook. Students must also follow all policies and procedures in other university publications when applicable. The university reserves the right to suspend or dismiss any student at any time when, in the judgment of university authorities, the general welfare demands such action. All policies, practices, procedures and regulations listed in university publications are subject to change. Every effort will be made to provide appropriate supplements and announcements indicating major alterations in current policies, practices, procedures and regulations. To receive more information about university policies and procedures, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at (708) 524-6822.

ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICY
Drug Free Campus/Workplace Policy Statement
The Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act mandates that institutions of higher education adopt and implement a policy designed to prevent the unlawful possession, use, dispensation or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by faculty, staff and students and, provide certification to the Department of Education that such a policy is in place. The university has developed this policy not only in response to this federal anti-drug legislation, but also to provide a healthy environment by preventing the use of illegal drugs or the abuse of alcohol within the university community.

Any faculty, staff or student who violates this policy or does not cooperate with the university in its attempts to maintain a drug-free environment will face disciplinary action up to and including termination/expulsion from the university. Such persons also may be required, as a condition of continuing their relationship with the university, to enroll in substance-abuse counseling and/or a treatment program at their own expense.

Individuals violating any town ordinances, state criminal laws or federal laws relating to alcohol or drug use may risk fines and imprisonment. In the event prosecution occurs outside the University, students may also be subject to the University’s Student Conduct process.

Faculty, staff and students are encouraged to familiarize themselves with resources available in the area for substance-abuse counseling and treatment. In addition, the counseling services in the Wellness Center are available to assist students with substance-related problems. The Wellness Center respects the confidential nature of information shared by participants in its programs. Faculty and staff may utilize the resources in the Employee Assistance Program available through Human Resources to receive referrals to resources. If questions arise related to any of these guidelines or policies, please direct them to the appropriate university department.

This policy applies to all Dominican University faculty, staff and students.
1. In compliance with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988, Dominican University is committed to the maintenance of a drug-free workplace and is committed to rigorous enforcement of applicable laws and policies to support those trying to cope with drug-related problems.
2. Dominican University is committed to maintaining a drug-free workplace in compliance with applicable laws. The use, possession, distribution, dispensation, sale or manufacture of controlled substances is prohibited on university property or as any part of it activities. Violation of this policy may result in disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment and or expulsion from the university.
3. The illegal or improper use of controlled substances can: seriously injure the health of others: adversely impair the performance of responsibilities: and endanger the safety and well-being of fellow employees, students and members of the general public. It is therefore the policy of Dominican University to discourage the use of controlled substances by its faculty, staff and students at any time. Faculty and staff seeking resources for substance abuse issues may confidentially contact Human Resources. Students can contact the Wellness Center for confidential support and resources.
4. An employee of Dominican University will notify their supervisor if they are convicted of a criminal drug offense involving the workplace within five days of conviction (this includes student workers). Such conviction will be grounds for mandatory evaluation and possible treatment for a substance abuse disorder, and for disciplinary action up to and including termination. In the event any such conviction involves an employee working on a federal contract or grant, the University will notify the granting or contracting federal agency within 10 days of receiving notice of a conviction.
5. This statement and its requirements are promulgated in accordance with the requirements of the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 enacted by the U.S. Congress. The university will continue its effort to maintain a drug-free environment by adhering to the above policy and by providing on-going drug awareness programs.
6. Failure to comply with the foregoing rules will be grounds for disciplinary action up to and including termination. The terms of this policy statement are conditions of employment at the university.

ALCOHOL POLICY
Dominican University’s alcohol policy, written in accordance with the Drug-Free Campus Act and Illinois State law, supports the mission of the institution and its academic goals.
• Alcohol is not allowed in public areas of the university. This includes, but is not limited to, classrooms, lounges, parking lots, library, hallways, etc.
• No one under the age of 21 is allowed to possess or consume alcohol.
• Any alcohol that is possessed by a minor, and/or is present during any policy violation, may be confiscated and/or emptied.
• The manufacturing, brewing, purchasing or selling of alcohol is never allowed.
• Excessive drinking and intoxication will not be tolerated and is a violation of the policy.
• Members of the community who choose to drink will be held fully responsible for their behavior while under the influence of alcohol. Loss of control due to intoxication in no way excuses or justifies violation of state law, university regulations or the rights of others.
• Any violation of state laws regarding alcohol will be considered grounds for university disciplinary action.

Any event sponsored by a university department must complete the Alcohol Registration Checklist which notifies the Dean of Students and Campus Safety of the event. All student organization or student group events at which alcohol will be served or consumed must be approved by the Dean of Students. Student organizations or groups are encouraged to meet with the Dean of Students early in the event planning process to determine if approval will be granted. A checklist assuring all liability and risk management standards have been adhered to will be completed by the hosting/sponsoring department or division.

The hosting/sponsoring department or division of the event is responsible for all aspects of the event including, but not limited to, the following standards:
• Registering and purchasing all liquor licenses in compliance with local, state and federal laws.
• Providing proof of liability insurance and liquor license, if the venue is off-campus.
• Hiring of sufficient security personnel.
• Hiring approved bartenders that are trained and certified in TIPS or other equivalent training program. If the venue is off-campus, proof of training and certification is required for the bartenders.
• Supervision of underage persons to ensure there is no underage consumption of alcohol (i.e., carding). No one under the age of 21 is allowed to serve, possess or consume alcohol.
• Appropriate removal and disposal of all unused alcohol.
• Any and all costs for insurance or damage to university property.
• No kegs, beer bongs, party balls or other common containers of alcohol are allowed, unless advance written notice is made by the appropriate university official and approved by the Dean of Students.

RESIDENCE HALLS
• Only those 21 or older may possess or consume alcohol in the residence halls room of those that are 21 or over. Both residents and visitors in the room where alcohol is being consumed must be 21 or over.
• Those who are 21 or older are prohibited from giving alcohol to minors.
• No one under 21 may be present in a residence hall room where alcohol is being consumed, unless it is a host student’s roommate.
• Anyone of legal drinking age bringing alcohol into the residence hall must cover it.
• Common-source containers (kegs, etc.) are not allowed and will be confiscated and not returned.
• Students may not display empty containers, including but not limited to, shot glasses, wine bottles, etc in their rooms or in their windows.
• Students are not allowed to display alcohol promotions or advertisements in their room, on their doors, or in their windows.

DRUG POLICY
The unlawful use, possession, manufacturing, selling, and/or distribution of illicit drugs are strictly prohibited at Dominican University. Students, who use, sell, create, possess, distribute or provide controlled substances will be subject to disciplinary action as outlined in the student code of conduct.
Although Illinois has passed laws allowing the use of medical marijuana and recreational marijuana in certain circumstances, federal laws classify marijuana as a controlled substance and prohibit marijuana use, possession, and distribution on property owned by institutions of higher education or in any activities operated by such institutions. In addition, the applicable Illinois laws indicate that colleges and universities are not prevented from prohibiting marijuana consistent with federal law. As such, the use, possession, and distribution of marijuana on DU’s campus (or other DU property) or as any part of its activities remains prohibited, notwithstanding Illinois laws legalizing the use of medical and recreational marijuana.
Any drug or drug paraphernalia will be confiscated from the student and not returned. This includes, but is not limited to, lighters, roach clips, scales, bowls, baggies, hookahs, bongs, pipes, e-cigarettes, etc.
When adjudicating any case involving drugs, physical evidence of drug use is not required for a finding of responsibility in a case. Scent or smell of drug use, or other behaviors and/or observations made by students and/or university officials and personnel, may be used in determining the outcome.

TOBACCO POLICY
The use of tobacco products is prohibited at all times while on Dominican University property.
• Tobacco is defined as all tobacco‐derived or containing products, including, but not limited to, cigarettes (clove, bidis, kreteks), electronic cigarettes, cigars and cigarillos, hookah‐smoked products, and oral tobacco (spit and spitless, smokeless, chew, snuff).
• Use of tobacco product is defined as follows: The inhaling, exhaling, burning, or carrying of any lighted smoking material on campus property, including but not limited to all outside property or grounds owned or wholly leased, sidewalks, parking lots, outdoor seating areas, stadium seating and all landscaped and recreational areas and all university vehicles and moving equipment.
• Smoking materials must be extinguished and disposed of prior to entering upon Dominican University property*, or exiting your vehicle. Improper disposal includes but is not limited to: littering (i.e. discarded cigarette butts and/or throwing cigarette butts out of windows).
*The Priory Campus main entrance is accessed through property owned by the Village of River Forest: ORDINANCE 111201: AN ORDINANCE REGULATING USE OF THE PARKS OF RIVER FOREST, COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS states that the smoking of cigarettes, cigars, or pipe tobacco is prohibited inside or within 25 feet of any building, facility or structure, or within 100’ of any organized activity within the Park System.

Immunity for Victims
Dominican University encourages the reporting of conduct code violations and crimes by victims. Sometimes victims are hesitant to report to college officials because they fear that they themselves may be accused of policy violations, such as underage drinking at the time of the incident. It is in the best interests of this community that as many victims as possible choose to report to university officials. To encourage reporting, Dominican University pursues a policy of offering amnesty from policy violations related to the incident.

Bystander Intervention
The welfare of students in our community is of paramount importance. At times, students on and off campus may need assistance. Dominican University encourages students to offer help and assistance to others in need. Sometimes, students are hesitant to offer assistance to others for fear that they may get in trouble themselves. Dominican University pursues a policy of limited immunity for students who offer help to others in need. While policy violations cannot be overlooked, the university will provide educational options, rather than punishment, to those who offer their assistance to others in need.

Parental Notification
Dominican University reserves the right to notify parents/guardians of dependent students regarding any conduct situation, particularly alcohol and other drug violations. The university may also notify parents/guardians of non-dependent students who are under age 21 of alcohol and/or drug policy violations. Where a student is non-dependent, Dominican University will contact parents/guardians to inform them of situations in which there is a health and/or safety risk. Dominican University also reserves the right to designate which university officials have a need to know about individual conduct complaints pursuant to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.

Student Code of Conduct Sanctions

 

Following is a list of possible sanctions. Sanctions not on this list may be given for violation of the Code of Conduct.

  • Warning/Reprimand: An official written notice that the behavior is in violation of policy with notification that further violations will result in more serious sanctions.
  • Educational/Creative Project(s): These sanctions are directly related to the incident or behavior and are designed to help educate the student about the consequences of their actions. These might include video or book review, attending a program, planning a program and/or assisting university staff.
  • Community Service: Student participation in an activity designed to assist the university or surrounding community, i.e., volunteer activities at local churches, hospitals, agencies, campus projects or facilities.
  • Restitution: Compensation for damage or loss to the University or any person’s property. 
  • Fines: Reasonable fines may be imposed for violation of University policy.
  • Confiscation of Prohibited Property: Items whose presence is in violation of University policy will be confiscated and will become the property of the University.
  • Loss of Privileges: The student will be denied specified privileges for a designated period of time.
  • Visitation Privilege Loss: A student may have their visitation privileges to the residence halls suspended or revoked indefinitely.
  • Behavioral Requirement: This includes required activities including, but not limited to, seeking academic counseling or substance abuse screening, writing a letter of apology, etc.
  • Probation(s): Supervision of the student’s conduct for a designated period of time during which a subsequent infraction of any university regulation or any standard will result in more serious conduct action. Terms of probation are to be decided by the conduct officers and can include but are not limited to: a) inability to represent the university in an official capacity such as student leadership positions, athletics, etc. and b) inability to participate in university activities or designated events.  Probationary meetings may also be imposed.  The student is deemed “not in good disciplinary standing” for the period of probation.
  • No-Trespass Order: The student will not be allowed to enter university buildings or other university property as defined in the sanction.
  • Relocation of Housing: The student’s room assignment may be changed to an alternate room or building.
  • University Housing Suspension: Removal from University housing for a specified period of time after which the student is eligible to return.  Conditions for re-admission to University housing may be specified.  A student is required to vacate the residence hall at the date and time specified in the Hearing Outcome Letter.
  • Expulsion From Residence: The student’s privilege to live in, or visit, any University housing structure is revoked for an extended period of time or permanently. 
  • Suspension: Separation of the student from the university for a specified minimum period of time, after which the student is eligible to return.  Eligibility may be contingent upon satisfaction of specific conditions noted at the time of suspension.  During the suspension period, the student is banned from university property, facilities and events. 
  • Termination of Scholarship: Removal/termination of any scholarship provided by Dominican University.
  • Expulsion: Permanent separation of the student from the university. The student will not be allowed to re-enroll in the university.  The student is banned from university property, facilities and events.
  • Other Sanctions: Additional or alternate sanctions may be created and designed as deemed appropriate to the offense with the approval of the Dean of Students or designee.

 

Any of the above sanctions may be imposed upon groups or organizations found in violation of the Student Code of Conduct.  In addition, deactivation, de-recognition, loss of all privileges (including status as a University registered group or organization), for a specified period of time.

 

Alcohol and Drug Violation Sanctions

Each conduct hearing takes into the specific circumstances of the incident.  The Conduct History of a student will be a factor in determining specific sanctions. Multiple policy violations in a single incident will be used to determine appropriate sanctions, however, typical sanctions include: 

Alcohol                

Underage drinking; Open alcohol in a public area; Possession of alcohol with underage individuals present; Excessive alcohol use regardless of age

1st offense:        Online Alcohol Education Course with Reflection Paper, and 2 hours of community

service

2nd offense:      Semester Probation and 4 hours of community service

3rd offense:       Extension of probation and 6 hours of community service or suspension from halls

(typically 2-4 weeks)

Students with possible substance abuse problems may be sanctioned to a Wellness Assessment.

 

Drugs

Possession or use of illegal drugs or drug-related items in the residence halls or on campus

1st offense:        Online Drug Education Course, Reflection Paper, One Year Probation and 4 hours of

community service

2nd offense:      Extension of probation and suspension from halls (from 2 weeks to indefinitely) or

significant education project

Students with possible substance abuse problems may be sanctioned to take a Wellness Assessment.

 

Tobacco

Finding cigarette butts or ash in room; Smoking on university grounds; Violation of the Tobacco Policy

1st offense:        Warning and 2 hours of community service

2nd offense:      4 hours of community service

3rd offense:       Probation

 

 

 

SAMPLE ILLINOIS SANCTIONS FOR VIOLATION OF ALCOHOL CONTROL STATUTES (See Illinois Compiled Statute 235 ILCS 5/ for more specific information)

 

A. It is a Class A Misdemeanor to possess or sell alcohol if you are under 21.

B. It is a Class A Misdemeanor to sell, give, or furnish false ID to an individual 21 years old or under (minimum $500 fine).

C. It is a Class A Misdemeanor to use or possess a false ID if you are under 21.

D. It is a Class A Misdemeanor to sell, give, or deliver alcohol to individuals under 21 years of age. Local ordinances may also be enforced.

 

Class A Misdemeanors are punishable with a fine of $1 to $1,000 and up to 1 year in the county jail.

 

FEDERAL DRUG POSSESSION PENALTIES (21 USC 844)

 

Persons convicted on Federal charges of possessing any controlled substance face penalties of up to 1 year in prison and a mandatory fine of no less than $1,000 up to a maximum of $100,000. Second convictions are punishable by not less than 15 days but not more than 2 years in prison and a minimum fine of $2,500. Subsequent convictions are punishable by not less than 90 days but not more than 3 years in prison and a minimum fine of $5,000. Possession of drug paraphernalia is punishable by a minimum fine of $750.

 

Special sentencing provisions for possession of crack cocaine impose a mandatory prison term of not less than 5 years but not more than 20 years and a fine up to $250,000, or both if:

A. It is a first conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 5 grams;

B. It is a second conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 3 grams;

C. It is a third or subsequent crack conviction and the amount exceeds 1 gram.

 

Civil penalties of up to $10,000 may also be imposed for possession of small amounts of controlled substances, whether or not criminal prosecution is pursued.

 

SAMPLE ILLINOIS SANCTIONS FOR VIOLATION OF DRUG CONTROL STATUTES (See Illinois Compiled Statute 720 ILCS 570/ for more specific information)

Possession of Cannabis:

A. It is a Class A Misdemeanor to possess from 10 to 29 grams of Cannabis.

B. It is a Class 4 Felony to possess 30 grams to 499 grams of Cannabis.

C. It is a Class 3 Felony to possess 500 grams to 1999 grams of Cannabis.

D. It is a Class 2 Felony to possess 2000 grams to 4999 grams of Cannabis.

E. It is a Class 1 Felony to possess more than 5000 grams of Cannabis.

 

Possession of Cocaine:

A. It is a Class 4 Felony to possess 0-15 grams

B. It is a Class 1 Felony to possess 15-100 grams.

C. It is a Class 1 Felony to possess 100-400 grams.

D. It is a Class 1 Felony to possess 400-900 grams.

E. It is a Class 1 Felony to possess 900+ grams.

 

Possession of Heroin/LSD:

A. It is a Class 4 Felony to possess 0-14 grams

B. It is a Class 1 Felony to possess 15-99 grams.

C. It is a Class 1 Felony to possess 100-399 grams.

D. It is a Class 1 Felony to possess 400-899 grams.

E. It is a Class 1 Felony to possess 900+ grams.

 

Class 4 Felony sentence may be from 1 to 3 years in a state penitentiary.

Class 3 Felony sentence may be from 2 to 5 years in a state penitentiary.

Class 2 Felony sentence may be from 3 to 7 years in a state penitentiary.

Class 1 Felony sentence may be from 3 to 15 years in a state penitentiary.

 

This is not an exhaustive list of narcotics and controlled substances that are subject to Illinois Compiled Statutes and which may have local, state, and/or federal sentencing guidelines.

 

State of Illinois Statutory Provisions For Illegal Drugs Manufacture or Delivery

 

Manufacture or Delivery (720 Illinois Compiled Statutes 570/401)

Possession (720 ILCS 570/402)

Illegal Drugs

Class X Felony

Class 1 Felony

Class 2 Felony

Class 3 Felony

Class 1 Felony

Class 4 Felony

 

not more than
$500,000 fine

not more than
$250,000 fine

not more than
$200,000 fine

not more than
$150,000 fine

not more than
$20,000 fine

not more than
$15,000 fine

 

Min. 6 years

4 to 15 years

3 to 7 years

2 to 5 years

4 to 15 years

1 to 4 years

Heroin

15 grams or more

10-14 grams

10 grams or less

 

15 grams or more

less than 15 grams

Cocaine

15 grams or more

1-14 grams

1 gram or less

 

15 grams or more

less than 15 grams

Morphine

15 grams or more

10-14 grams

10 grams or less

 

15 grams or more

less than 15 grams

Peyote

200 grams or more

50-199 grams

 

50 grams or less

200 grams or more

less than 200 grams

Barbiturates

200 grams or more

50-199 grams

 

50 grams or less

200 grams or more

less than 200 grams

Amphetamines

200 grams or more

50-199 grams

 

50 grams or less

200 grams or more

less than 200 grams

Lysergic Acid (LSD)

15 grams or more

5 to 14 grams or hits

 

5 grams or less

15 grams or more

less than 15 grams

Petazocine

30 grams or more

10 to 29 grams

 

10 grams or less

30 grams or more

less than 30 grams

Methaqualone

30 grams or more

10 to 29 grams

 

10 grams or less

30 grams or more

less than 30 grams

Phencyclidine

30 grams or more

10 to 29 grams

 

30 grams or less

30 grams or more

less than 30 grams

Ketamine

30 grams or more

11 to 30 grams

 

less than 10 grams

30 grams or more

less than 30 grams

GHB

200 grams or more

50 to 200 grams

 

less than 50 grams

200 grams or more

less than 200 grams

Ecstasy

200 grams or more

50 to 199 grams

 

50 grams or less

200 grams or more

less than 200 grams

Note: Second Offense, double jail sentence and fine. This chart gives examples of the penalties which may be imposed on individuals convicted of drug possession, manufacturing, or delivery. The circumstances of the case and other factors affect whether or not these are the actual penalties imposed.

 

Marijuana Sale or Delivery (720 Illinois Compiled Statutes 550/5)

Class B Misdemeanor: 2.5 grams or less, $500 fine and/or six months in jail

Class A Misdemeanor: 2.5-10 grams or less, $1,000 fine and/or one year in jail

Class 4 Felony: between 10-30 grams, 1-3 years in jail and/or $10,000 fine

Class 3 Felony: between 30-500 grams, 2-5 years in jail and/or fine not to exceed $50,000

Class 2 Felony: 500 or more grams, 3-7 years in jail and/or fine not to exceed $100,000

 

Possession (720 Illinois compiled Statutes 550/4)

Class C Misdemeanor: 2.5 grams or less, $500 fine and/or thirty days in jail

Class B Misdemeanor: between 2.5-10 grams, $500 fine and/or six months in jail

Class A Misdemeanor: between 10-30 grams, $1,000 fine and/or one year in jail

Class 4 Felony: between 30-500 grams, 1-3 years in jail and/or $10,000 fine

Class 3 Felony: over 500 grams, 2-5 years in jail and/or fine not to exceed $50,000

 

Federal Drug Laws

The possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs is prohibited by federal law. Strict penalties are enforced for drug convictions, including mandatory prison terms for many offenses. The following information, although not complete, is an overview of federal penalties for first convictions. All penalties are doubled for any subsequent drug conviction.

 

Denial of Federal Aid (20 USC 1091)

Under the Higher Education Act of 1998, students convicted under federal or state law for the sale or possession of drugs may have their federal financial aid eligibility suspended. This includes all federal grants, loans, federal work study programs, and more. Students convicted of drug possession will be ineligible for one year from the date of the conviction of the first offense, two years for the second offense, and indefinitely for the third offense. Students convicted of selling drugs will be ineligible for two years from the date of the first conviction, and indefinitely for the second offense. Those who lose eligibility can regain eligibility by successfully completing an approved drug rehabilitation program.

 

Forfeiture of Personal Property and Real Estate (21 USC 853)

Any person convicted of a federal drug offense punishable by more than one year in prison shall forfeit to the United States any personal or real property related to the violation, including houses, cars, and other personal belongings. A warrant of seizure is issued and property is seized at the time an individual is arrested on charges that may result in forfeiture.

 

Federal Drug Trafficking Penalties (21 USC 841)

Penalties for federal drug trafficking convictions vary according to the quantity of the controlled substance involved in the transaction. The following list is a sample of the range and severity of federal penalties imposed for first convictions. Penalties for subsequent convictions are twice as severe.

If death or serious bodily injury result from the use of a controlled substance which has been illegally distributed, the person convicted on federal charges of distributing the substance faces mandatory life sentence and fines ranging up to $8 million.

Persons convicted on federal charges of drug trafficking within 1,000 feet of a University (21 USC 845a) face penalties of prison terms and fines which are twice as high as the regular penalties for the offense, with a mandatory prison sentence of at least 1 year.

 

Drug/Substance

Amount

Penalty - 1st Conviction

Barbiturates

Any amount

Up to 5 years prison. Fine up to $250,000

Cocaine

5 kgs. or more

Not less than 10 years prison, not more than life. Fine up to $4 million

Less than 100 grams

10-63 months prison. Fine up to $1 million

Crack Cocaine

50 grams or more

Not less than 10 years prison, not more than life. Fine up to $4 million

5-49 grams

Not less than 5 years prison, not more than 40 years. Fine up to $2 million

5 grams or less

10-63 months prison. Fine up to $1 million

Ecstasy

Any amount

Up to 20 years imprisonment. Fine up to $1 million. 3 years of supervised releases (following prison)

GHB

Any amount

Up to 20 years imprisonment. Fine up to $1 million. 3 years of supervised releases (following prison)

Hashish

10-100 kg

Up to 20 years imprisonment. Fine up to $1 million.

10 kg or less

Up to 5 years imprisonment. Fine up to $250,000

Hash Oil

1-100 kg

Up to 20 years imprisonment. Fine up to $1 million.

1 kg or less

Up to 5 years imprisonment. Fine up to $250,000

Heroin

1 kg or more

Not less than 10 years prison, not more than life. Fine up to $4 million

100-999 grams

Not less than 5 years prison, not more than 40 years. Fine up to $2 million

100 grams or less

10-63 months prison. Fine up to $1 million

Ketamine

Any amount

Up to 5 years imprisonment. Fine up to $250,000. 2 years supervised release

LSD

10 grams or more

Not less than 10 years prison, not more than life. Fine up to $4 million

1-10 grams

Not less than 5 years prison, not more than 40 years. Fine up to $2 million

Marijuana

1000 kg or more

Not less than 10 years prison, not more than life. Fine up to $4 million

100-999 kg

Not less than 5 years prison, not more than 40 years. Fine up to $2 million

50-99 kg

Up to 20 years imprisonment. Fine up to $1 million

50 kg or less

Up to 5 years imprisonment. Fine up to $250,000

Methamphetamine

50 grams or more

Not less than 10 years prison, not more than life. Fine up to $4 million

10-49 grams

Not less than 5 years prison, not more than 40 years. Fine up to $2 million

10 grams or less

10-21 months prison. Fine up to $1 million

PCP

100 grams or more

Not less than 10 years prison, not more than life. Fine up to $4 million

10-99 grams

Not less than 5 years prison, not more than 40 years. Fine up to $2 million

10 grams or less

10-21 months prison. Fine up to $1 million

Rohypnol

1 gram or more

Up to 20 years imprisonment. Fine up to $1 million

less than 30 mgs

Up to 5 years imprisonment. Fine up to $250,000

 

Federal Drug Possession Penalties (21 USC 844)

Persons convicted on Federal charges of possessing any controlled substance face penalties of up to 1 year in prison and a mandatory fine of no less than $1,000 up to a maximum of $100,000. Second convictions are punishable by not less than 15 days but not more than 2 years in prison and a minimum fine of $2,500. Subsequent convictions are punishable by not less than 90 days but not more than 3 years in prison and a minimum fine of $5,000. Possession of drug paraphernalia is punishable by a minimum fine of $750.

Special sentencing provisions for possession of crack cocaine impose a mandatory prison term of not less than 5 years but not more than 20 years and a fine up to $250,000, or both if:

  1. It is a first conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 5 grams;
  2. It is a second conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 3 grams;
  3. It is a third or subsequent crack conviction and the amount exceeds 1 gram.

Civil penalties of up to $10,000 may also be imposed for possession of small amounts of controlled substances, whether or not criminal prosecution is pursued.

 

Illinois Sanctions for Driving Under the Influence

625 Illinois Compiled Statutes 5/11-501

  1. Driving while under the influence of alcohol, other drug or drugs, intoxicating compound or compounds or any combination thereof
    1. First Conviction
      1. Minimum of one-year loss of full driving privileges
      2. Possible imprisonment for up to one year
      3. Maximum fine of $2,500
    2. Second Conviction
      1. Minimum five-year loss of full driving privileges for a second conviction in a 20-year period
      2. Mandatory five days imprisonment or 240 hours of community service
      3. Possible imprisonment for up to one year
      4. Maximum fine of $2,5000
    3. Third Conviction – Class 2 Felony
      1. Minimum ten-year loss of full driving privileges
      2. Mandatory 18-30 month periodic imprisonment
      3. Possible imprisonment for up to seven years
      4. Maximum fine of $25,000
    4. Aggravated DUI – Class 4 Felony (following a crash resulting in great bodily harm or permanent disfigurement)
      1. Minimum of one-year loss of full driving privileges
      2. Mandatory ten days imprisonment or 480 hours of community service
      3. Possible imprisonment for up to twelve years
      4. Maximum fine of $25,000
  2. Other alcohol offenses
    1. Providing alcohol to a person under age 21
      1. Possible imprisonment for up to one year
      2. Maximum fine of $2,500
    2. Illegal transportation of an alcoholic beverage
      1. Maximum fine of $1,000
      2. Point-assigned violation will be entered on drivers record
      3. Drivers license suspension for a second conviction in a 12 month period
    3. Knowingly permitting a driver under the influence to operate a vehicle
      1. Possible imprisonment for up to one year
      2. Maximum fine of $2,500
    4. Summary Suspension
      1. First offense
        1. A chemical test indication a BAC of .08 or greater results in a mandatory six-month drivers license suspension
        2. Refusal to submit to a chemical test(s) results in a twelve-month suspension
      2. Subsequent offenses
        1. A chemical test indicating a BAC of .08 or greater results in a mandatory one-year drivers license suspension
        2. Refusal to submit to a chemical test(s) results in a three-year license suspension

 

Illinois Penalties for Drinking and Driving Under Age 21

  1. Driving while under the influence of alcohol, other drug or drugs, intoxicating compound or compounds or any combination thereof
    1. First Conviction
      1. Minimum of two-year loss of full driving privileges
      2. Possible imprisonment for up to one year
      3. Maximum fine of $2,500
    2. Second Conviction
      1. Minimum five-year loss of full driving privileges for a second conviction in a 20-year period
      2. Mandatory five days imprisonment or 240 hours of community service
      3. Possible imprisonment for up to one year
      4. Maximum fine of $2,5000
    3. Third Conviction – Class 2 Felony
      1. Minimum ten-year loss of full driving privileges
      2. Mandatory 18-30 month periodic imprisonment
      3. Possible imprisonment for up to seven years
      4. Maximum fine of $25,000
    4. Aggravated DUI – Class 4 Felony (following a crash resulting in great bodily harm or permanent disfigurement)
      1. Minimum of one-year loss of full driving privileges
      2. Possible imprisonment for up to twelve years
      3. Maximum fine of $25,000
  2. Other alcohol offenses
    1. Illegal transportation of an alcoholic beverage
      1. Maximum fine of $1,000
      2. Drivers license suspended for first conviction
      3. Drivers license revoked for a second conviction
    2. Summary Suspension
      1. First offense
        1. A chemical test indication a BAC of .08 or greater results in a mandatory six-month drivers license suspension
        2. Refusal to submit to a chemical test(s) results in a twelve-month suspension
      2. Subsequent offenses
        1. A chemical test indicating a BAC of .08 or greater results in a mandatory one-year drivers license suspension
        2. Refusal to submit to a chemical test(s) results in a three-year license suspension
  1. The Zero Tolerance Law provides that minors can have their driving privileges suspended even if they're not intoxicated at the .08 level. The following table shows the length of time your driving privileges may be suspended under the Zero Tolerance Law (for BAC of .01 or greater) and DUI Laws (for BAC of .08 or greater). The loss of driving privileges is greater if you refuse to take a sobriety test.

 

Under Zero Tolerance Law

Under DUI Laws

 

 

If test refused

 

If test refused

1st violation

3 months

6 months

6 months

12 months

2nd violation

1 year

2 years

1 year

3 years

 

Effect on Driving Record

  • Zero tolerance (BAC of .01 or greater) – except during suspension period, not on public driving record as long as there is no subsequent suspension.
  • DUI conviction (BAC of .08 or greater) – Permanently on public driving record

*Under certain conditions, you may be charged with DUI even though your BAC is below .08.

Except during suspension period, violation is not on public driving record as long as there is no subsequent suspension permanently on public driving record.

Resources

Help is available both on campus and within the community for students and staff members who are dependent on, or who abuse the use of alcohol or other drugs. Dominican University Wellness Center (708-524-6629), Lincoln Financial Group Employee Assistance Program at  https://www.lfg.com/public/individual, and other professional agencies will maintain the confidentiality of persons seeking help for personal dependency and will not report them to institutional or state authorities. The Dean of Students and Human Resources provides educational and awareness programming, information, and assistance.

 

Wellness Center Resources

Lower Level Coughlin Hall.  wellness@dom.edu  708-524-6229 

 

Alcohol and Drug Prevention Screening and Intervention Packet:

The DU Wellness accepts referrals from all departments to help students with education, prevention, screening and treatment for additions of all types. 

 

Here are some of our tools and resources.

MAST: http://counsellingresource.com/quizzes/drug-testing/alcohol-mast/

SASSI: https://www.sassi.com/sassi-4-announcement/  Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory is a psychological exam used to detect alcohol, drugs or Rx drug abuse, to distinguish between that and other psychological disorders and to evaluate severity.

Clinical Exam: CADC (Certified Drug and Alcohol Counselor) Psychologist administers these instruments as well as a thorough clinical interview.  During that exam alcohol education and prevention messages are provided to students at all levels of severity and risk.

 

Treatment Protocols:  The Wellness Center partners with many community partners in caring for students who need inpatient detox, Intensive Outpatient intervention, combination and other recovery and mental health services. 

 

ON-CAMPUS RESOURCES/INFORMATION

Athletic Department

708-524-6323

Athletic Trainer

708-521-6226

Campus Safety

708-524-5999

Dean of Students

708-524-6822

Employee Assistance Program

https://www.lfg.com/public/individual

Human Resources

708-524-6790

Student Life – Housing

708-524-6218

Wellness Center

708-524-6229

 

 

OFF-CAMPUS RESOURCES/INFORMATION

Alexian Brothers Dual Diagnosis Unit
Alexian Brothers focuses on the addiction continuum from prevention education and screening through recovery.  They are specialists in dual diagnosis and process addictions (gambling, etc) They offer free evaluations.

http://www.alexianbrothershealth.org/abbhh/center-addiction-medicine/treatment-approach

Rosecrance Multi-site services focused on recovery. 40 locations in Chicago and Northern Illinois, Wisconsin and Iowa, Rosecrance offers comprehensive addiction services for adolescents and adults, including prevention, intervention, detoxification, inpatient and outpatient treatment, experiential therapies, dual-diagnosis care and family education. Rosecrance also offers high-quality, efficient and effective outpatient mental health services for children, adults and families through a variety of programs.

 

http://www.rosecrance.org/ 

Thrive Counseling Center Free screening for alcohol and drug abuse on Thursdays through Rosecrance

708-383-7500

www.ThriveCC.org 

Local Police Department – Emergency

911

Local Police Department – Non - Emergency

708-366-7125
 https://www.policeone.com/police-departments/river-forest-police-dept-river-forest-il/

County Sheriff’s Office – Emergency

911

County Sheriff’s Office – Non-Emergency

(773) 674-CCSO http://www.cookcountysheriff.org/

Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office

(312) 603-1880
http://www.statesattorney.org/

Health Risks of Commonly Abused Substances

Substance

Nicknames/Slang Terms

Short Term

Effects

Long Term Effects

Alcohol

 

slurred speech, drowsiness,

headaches,

impaired judgment,

decreased perception and coordination, distorted vision and hearing ,

vomiting,

breathing difficulties,

unconsciousness,

coma,

blackouts,

toxic psychosis, physical dependence, neurological and liver damage, fetal alcohol syndrome, vitamin B1 deficiency, sexual problems, cancer, physical dependence

Amphetamines

uppers, speed, meth, crack, crystal, ice, pep pills

increased heart rate, increased blood pressure, dry mouth, loss of appetite, restlessness, irritability, anxiety

delusions, hallucinations, heart problems, hypertension, irritability, insomnia, toxic psychosis, physical dependence

Barbiturates and Tranquilizers

barbs, bluebirds, blues, yellow jackets, red devils, roofies, rohypnol, ruffies, tranqs, mickey, flying v's

slurred speech, muscle relaxation, dizziness, decreased motor control

severe withdrawal symptoms, possible convulsions, toxic psychosis, depression, physical dependence

Cocaine

coke, cracks, snow, powder, blow, rock

loss of appetite

increased blood pressure and heart rate, contracted blood vessels, nausea,

hyper-stimulation anxiety, paranoia, increased hostility

Increased rate of breathing, muscle spasms and convulsions.

dilated pupils

disturbed sleep,

depression, weight loss, high blood pressure, seizure, heart attack, stroke, hypertension, hallucinations, psychosis, chronic cough, nasal passage injury, kidney, liver and lung damage

Gamma Hydroxy Butyrate

GHB, liquid B, liquid X, liquid ecstasy, G, georgia homeboy, grievous bodily harm

euphoria, decreased inhibitions, drowsiness, sleep,  decreased body temperature, decreased heart rate, decreased blood pressure

memory loss, depression, severe withdrawal symptoms, physical dependence, psychological dependence

Heroin

H, junk, smack, horse, skag

euphoria, flushing of the skin, dry mouth, “heavy” arms and legs, slowed breathing, muscular weakness

constipation, loss of appetite, lethargy, weakening of the immune system,

respiratory (breathing) illnesses,

muscular weakness, partial paralysis, coma, physical dependence, psychological dependence

Ketamine

K, super K, special K

dream-like states, hallucinations, impaired attention and memory, delirium, impaired motor function, high blood pressure, depression

Urinary tract and bladder problems, abdominal pain, major convulsions, muscle rigidity , increased confusion, increased depression, physical dependence, psychological dependence

LSD

acid, stamps, dots, blotter, A-bombs

dilated pupils, change in body temperature, blood pressure and heart rate, sweating, chills, loss of appetite, decreased sleep, tremors, changes in visual acuity, mood changes

may intensify existing psychosis, panic reactions, can interfere with psychological adjustment and social functioning, insomnia, physical dependence, psychological dependence

MDMA

ecstasy, XTC, adam, X, rolls, pills

impaired judgment, confusion, confusion, blurred vision,  teeth clenching, depression,

anxiety, paranoia, sleep problems, muscle tension

 

same as LSD, sleeplessness, nausea, confusion, increased blood pressure, sweating , depression, anxiety, memory loss

 kidney failure, cardiovascular problems, convulsions

death, physical dependence, psychological dependence

Marijuana/Cannabis

pot, grass, dope, weed, joint, bud, reefer, doobie, roach

sensory distortion, poor coordination of movement

slowed reaction time,

panic, anxiety

 

bronchitis, conjunctivas, lethargy, shortened attention span, suppressed immune system, personality changes, cancer, psychological dependence, physical dependence possible for some

Mescaline

peyote cactus

nausea, vomiting, anxiety, delirium, hallucinations, increased heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature,

lasting physical and mental trauma, intensified existing psychosis, psychological dependence

Morphine/Opiates

M, morf, duramorph, Miss Emma, monkey, roxanol, white stuff

euphoria, increased  body temperature, dry mouth, “heavy” feeling in arms and legs

constipation, loss of appetite

collapsed veins, heart infections, liver disease, depressed respiration, pneumonia  and other pulmonary complications, physical dependence, psychological dependence

PCP

crystal, tea, angel dust, embalming fluid, killer weed, rocket fuel, supergrass, wack, ozone

shallow breathing, flushing, profuse sweating, numbness in arms and legs, decreased muscular coordination, nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, delusions, paranoia, disordered thinking

memory loss, difficulties with speech and thinking, depression, weight loss, psychotic behavior, violent acts, psychosis, physical dependence, psychological dependence

Psilocybin

mushrooms, magic mushrooms, shrooms, caps,  psilocybin & psilocyn

nausea, distorted perceptions, nervousness, paranoia,

confusion, memory loss, shortened attention span, flashbacks may intensify existing psychosis,

Steroids

roids, juice

increased lean muscle mass, increased strength, acne, oily skin, excess hair growth, high blood pressure

Cholesterol imbalance, anger management problems, masculinization or women, breast enlargement in men, premature fusion of long bones preventing attainment of normal height, atrophy of reproductive organs, impotence, reduced fertility, stroke, hypertension, congestive heart failure, liver damage, psychological dependence

 

 

Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program

 

Dominican University students experience an environment that encourages intellectual growth through free inquiry. We recognize that freedom to teach and learn depends upon truthful and caring conditions in the classroom, on the campus and in the larger community. The maintenance of the traditions of truth and caring demands a high standard of respect for the rights and dignity of others and for adherence to the necessary policies established to give order to our daily lives. Dominican University expects responsible social conduct of students, which reflects well on themselves and the university.

 

Dominican University is committed to fostering a campus environment that is conducive to academic inquiry, productive campus life, thoughtful study and discourse. A community exists on the basis of shared values and principles. At Dominican University, student members of the community are expected to uphold and abide by the standards of conduct that form the basis of the Student Code of Conduct. These standards are embodied within a set of core values that include integrity, social justice, respect, community and responsibility. When members of the community fail to exemplify these values, campus conduct proceedings are used to assert and uphold the Student Code of Conduct. 

 

Ultimately, each member of the Dominican University community is expected to assume responsibility for their conduct and to assume reasonable responsibility for the behavior of others. On occasion, this may involve bystander intervention when one member observes another in inappropriate conduct. At other times it will involve cooperation when the authorities are investigating instances of alleged misconduct.

 

The Student Code of Conduct is committed to an educational and developmental process that balances the interests of individual students with the interests of the University community.  The student conduct process at Dominican University is not intended to punish students. Rather, it exists to protect the interests of the community and to challenge those whose behavior is not in accordance with our standards. Sanctions are intended to challenge students’ moral and ethical decision-making and to help them bring their behavior into accord with our community expectations. When a student is unable to conform their behavior to community expectations, the student conduct process may determine that they should no longer share in the privilege of participating in this community.

 

Students should be aware that the student conduct process is quite different from criminal and civil court proceedings. Procedures and rights in student conduct proceedings are conducted with fairness to all, but do not include the same protections of due process afforded by the courts. Fair process, within these procedures, assures written notice and a hearing before an objective decision is made. It assures that no student will be found in violation of university policy without information showing that it is more likely than not that a policy violation occurred, and that any sanction will be proportionate to the severity of the violation and to the cumulative conduct history of the student.