Student Code of Conduct Sanctions

 

Following is a list of possible sanctions. Sanctions not on this list may be given for violation of the Code of Conduct.

  • Warning/Reprimand: An official written notice that the behavior is in violation of policy with notification that further violations will result in more serious sanctions.
  • Educational/Creative Project(s): These sanctions are directly related to the incident or behavior and are designed to help educate the student about the consequences of their actions. These might include video or book review, attending a program, planning a program and/or assisting university staff.
  • Community Service: Student participation in an activity designed to assist the university or surrounding community, i.e., volunteer activities at local churches, hospitals, agencies, campus projects or facilities.
  • Restitution: Compensation for damage or loss to the University or any person’s property. 
  • Fines: Reasonable fines may be imposed for violation of University policy.
  • Confiscation of Prohibited Property: Items whose presence is in violation of University policy will be confiscated and will become the property of the University.
  • Loss of Privileges: The student will be denied specified privileges for a designated period of time.
  • Visitation Privilege Loss: A student may have their visitation privileges to the residence halls suspended or revoked indefinitely.
  • Behavioral Requirement: This includes required activities including, but not limited to, seeking academic counseling or substance abuse screening, writing a letter of apology, etc.
  • Probation(s): Supervision of the student’s conduct for a designated period of time during which a subsequent infraction of any university regulation or any standard will result in more serious conduct action. Terms of probation are to be decided by the conduct officers and can include but are not limited to: a) inability to represent the university in an official capacity such as student leadership positions, athletics, etc. and b) inability to participate in university activities or designated events.  Probationary meetings may also be imposed.  The student is deemed “not in good disciplinary standing” for the period of probation.
  • No-Trespass Order: The student will not be allowed to enter university buildings or other university property as defined in the sanction.
  • Relocation of Housing: The student’s room assignment may be changed to an alternate room or building.
  • University Housing Suspension: Removal from University housing for a specified period of time after which the student is eligible to return.  Conditions for re-admission to University housing may be specified.  A student is required to vacate the residence hall at the date and time specified in the Hearing Outcome Letter.
  • Expulsion From Residence: The student’s privilege to live in, or visit, any University housing structure is revoked for an extended period of time or permanently. 
  • Suspension: Separation of the student from the university for a specified minimum period of time, after which the student is eligible to return.  Eligibility may be contingent upon satisfaction of specific conditions noted at the time of suspension.  During the suspension period, the student is banned from university property, facilities and events. 
  • Termination of Scholarship: Removal/termination of any scholarship provided by Dominican University.
  • Expulsion: Permanent separation of the student from the university. The student will not be allowed to re-enroll in the university.  The student is banned from university property, facilities and events.
  • Other Sanctions: Additional or alternate sanctions may be created and designed as deemed appropriate to the offense with the approval of the Dean of Students or designee.

 

Any of the above sanctions may be imposed upon groups or organizations found in violation of the Student Code of Conduct.  In addition, deactivation, de-recognition, loss of all privileges (including status as a University registered group or organization), for a specified period of time.

 

Alcohol and Drug Violation Sanctions

Each conduct hearing takes into the specific circumstances of the incident.  The Conduct History of a student will be a factor in determining specific sanctions. Multiple policy violations in a single incident will be used to determine appropriate sanctions, however, typical sanctions include: 

Alcohol                

Underage drinking; Open alcohol in a public area; Possession of alcohol with underage individuals present; Excessive alcohol use regardless of age

1st offense:        Online Alcohol Education Course with Reflection Paper, and 2 hours of community

service

2nd offense:      Semester Probation and 4 hours of community service

3rd offense:       Extension of probation and 6 hours of community service or suspension from halls

(typically 2-4 weeks)

Students with possible substance abuse problems may be sanctioned to a Wellness Assessment.

 

Drugs

Possession or use of illegal drugs or drug-related items in the residence halls or on campus

1st offense:        Online Drug Education Course, Reflection Paper, One Year Probation and 4 hours of

community service

2nd offense:      Extension of probation and suspension from halls (from 2 weeks to indefinitely) or

significant education project

Students with possible substance abuse problems may be sanctioned to take a Wellness Assessment.

 

Tobacco

Finding cigarette butts or ash in room; Smoking on university grounds; Violation of the Tobacco Policy

1st offense:        Warning and 2 hours of community service

2nd offense:      4 hours of community service

3rd offense:       Probation

 

 

 

SAMPLE ILLINOIS SANCTIONS FOR VIOLATION OF ALCOHOL CONTROL STATUTES (See Illinois Compiled Statute 235 ILCS 5/ for more specific information)

 

A. It is a Class A Misdemeanor to possess or sell alcohol if you are under 21.

B. It is a Class A Misdemeanor to sell, give, or furnish false ID to an individual 21 years old or under (minimum $500 fine).

C. It is a Class A Misdemeanor to use or possess a false ID if you are under 21.

D. It is a Class A Misdemeanor to sell, give, or deliver alcohol to individuals under 21 years of age. Local ordinances may also be enforced.

 

Class A Misdemeanors are punishable with a fine of $1 to $1,000 and up to 1 year in the county jail.

 

FEDERAL DRUG POSSESSION PENALTIES (21 USC 844)

 

Persons convicted on Federal charges of possessing any controlled substance face penalties of up to 1 year in prison and a mandatory fine of no less than $1,000 up to a maximum of $100,000. Second convictions are punishable by not less than 15 days but not more than 2 years in prison and a minimum fine of $2,500. Subsequent convictions are punishable by not less than 90 days but not more than 3 years in prison and a minimum fine of $5,000. Possession of drug paraphernalia is punishable by a minimum fine of $750.

 

Special sentencing provisions for possession of crack cocaine impose a mandatory prison term of not less than 5 years but not more than 20 years and a fine up to $250,000, or both if:

A. It is a first conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 5 grams;

B. It is a second conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 3 grams;

C. It is a third or subsequent crack conviction and the amount exceeds 1 gram.

 

Civil penalties of up to $10,000 may also be imposed for possession of small amounts of controlled substances, whether or not criminal prosecution is pursued.

 

SAMPLE ILLINOIS SANCTIONS FOR VIOLATION OF DRUG CONTROL STATUTES (See Illinois Compiled Statute 720 ILCS 570/ for more specific information)

Possession of Cannabis:

A. It is a Class A Misdemeanor to possess from 10 to 29 grams of Cannabis.

B. It is a Class 4 Felony to possess 30 grams to 499 grams of Cannabis.

C. It is a Class 3 Felony to possess 500 grams to 1999 grams of Cannabis.

D. It is a Class 2 Felony to possess 2000 grams to 4999 grams of Cannabis.

E. It is a Class 1 Felony to possess more than 5000 grams of Cannabis.

 

Possession of Cocaine:

A. It is a Class 4 Felony to possess 0-15 grams

B. It is a Class 1 Felony to possess 15-100 grams.

C. It is a Class 1 Felony to possess 100-400 grams.

D. It is a Class 1 Felony to possess 400-900 grams.

E. It is a Class 1 Felony to possess 900+ grams.

 

Possession of Heroin/LSD:

A. It is a Class 4 Felony to possess 0-14 grams

B. It is a Class 1 Felony to possess 15-99 grams.

C. It is a Class 1 Felony to possess 100-399 grams.

D. It is a Class 1 Felony to possess 400-899 grams.

E. It is a Class 1 Felony to possess 900+ grams.

 

Class 4 Felony sentence may be from 1 to 3 years in a state penitentiary.

Class 3 Felony sentence may be from 2 to 5 years in a state penitentiary.

Class 2 Felony sentence may be from 3 to 7 years in a state penitentiary.

Class 1 Felony sentence may be from 3 to 15 years in a state penitentiary.

 

This is not an exhaustive list of narcotics and controlled substances that are subject to Illinois Compiled Statutes and which may have local, state, and/or federal sentencing guidelines.

 

State of Illinois Statutory Provisions For Illegal Drugs Manufacture or Delivery

 

Manufacture or Delivery (720 Illinois Compiled Statutes 570/401)

Possession (720 ILCS 570/402)

Illegal Drugs

Class X Felony

Class 1 Felony

Class 2 Felony

Class 3 Felony

Class 1 Felony

Class 4 Felony

 

not more than
$500,000 fine

not more than
$250,000 fine

not more than
$200,000 fine

not more than
$150,000 fine

not more than
$20,000 fine

not more than
$15,000 fine

 

Min. 6 years

4 to 15 years

3 to 7 years

2 to 5 years

4 to 15 years

1 to 4 years

Heroin

15 grams or more

10-14 grams

10 grams or less

 

15 grams or more

less than 15 grams

Cocaine

15 grams or more

1-14 grams

1 gram or less

 

15 grams or more

less than 15 grams

Morphine

15 grams or more

10-14 grams

10 grams or less

 

15 grams or more

less than 15 grams

Peyote

200 grams or more

50-199 grams

 

50 grams or less

200 grams or more

less than 200 grams

Barbiturates

200 grams or more

50-199 grams

 

50 grams or less

200 grams or more

less than 200 grams

Amphetamines

200 grams or more

50-199 grams

 

50 grams or less

200 grams or more

less than 200 grams

Lysergic Acid (LSD)

15 grams or more

5 to 14 grams or hits

 

5 grams or less

15 grams or more

less than 15 grams

Petazocine

30 grams or more

10 to 29 grams

 

10 grams or less

30 grams or more

less than 30 grams

Methaqualone

30 grams or more

10 to 29 grams

 

10 grams or less

30 grams or more

less than 30 grams

Phencyclidine

30 grams or more

10 to 29 grams

 

30 grams or less

30 grams or more

less than 30 grams

Ketamine

30 grams or more

11 to 30 grams

 

less than 10 grams

30 grams or more

less than 30 grams

GHB

200 grams or more

50 to 200 grams

 

less than 50 grams

200 grams or more

less than 200 grams

Ecstasy

200 grams or more

50 to 199 grams

 

50 grams or less

200 grams or more

less than 200 grams

Note: Second Offense, double jail sentence and fine. This chart gives examples of the penalties which may be imposed on individuals convicted of drug possession, manufacturing, or delivery. The circumstances of the case and other factors affect whether or not these are the actual penalties imposed.

 

Marijuana Sale or Delivery (720 Illinois Compiled Statutes 550/5)

Class B Misdemeanor: 2.5 grams or less, $500 fine and/or six months in jail

Class A Misdemeanor: 2.5-10 grams or less, $1,000 fine and/or one year in jail

Class 4 Felony: between 10-30 grams, 1-3 years in jail and/or $10,000 fine

Class 3 Felony: between 30-500 grams, 2-5 years in jail and/or fine not to exceed $50,000

Class 2 Felony: 500 or more grams, 3-7 years in jail and/or fine not to exceed $100,000

 

Possession (720 Illinois compiled Statutes 550/4)

Class C Misdemeanor: 2.5 grams or less, $500 fine and/or thirty days in jail

Class B Misdemeanor: between 2.5-10 grams, $500 fine and/or six months in jail

Class A Misdemeanor: between 10-30 grams, $1,000 fine and/or one year in jail

Class 4 Felony: between 30-500 grams, 1-3 years in jail and/or $10,000 fine

Class 3 Felony: over 500 grams, 2-5 years in jail and/or fine not to exceed $50,000

 

Federal Drug Laws

The possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs is prohibited by federal law. Strict penalties are enforced for drug convictions, including mandatory prison terms for many offenses. The following information, although not complete, is an overview of federal penalties for first convictions. All penalties are doubled for any subsequent drug conviction.

 

Denial of Federal Aid (20 USC 1091)

Under the Higher Education Act of 1998, students convicted under federal or state law for the sale or possession of drugs may have their federal financial aid eligibility suspended. This includes all federal grants, loans, federal work study programs, and more. Students convicted of drug possession will be ineligible for one year from the date of the conviction of the first offense, two years for the second offense, and indefinitely for the third offense. Students convicted of selling drugs will be ineligible for two years from the date of the first conviction, and indefinitely for the second offense. Those who lose eligibility can regain eligibility by successfully completing an approved drug rehabilitation program.

 

Forfeiture of Personal Property and Real Estate (21 USC 853)

Any person convicted of a federal drug offense punishable by more than one year in prison shall forfeit to the United States any personal or real property related to the violation, including houses, cars, and other personal belongings. A warrant of seizure is issued and property is seized at the time an individual is arrested on charges that may result in forfeiture.

 

Federal Drug Trafficking Penalties (21 USC 841)

Penalties for federal drug trafficking convictions vary according to the quantity of the controlled substance involved in the transaction. The following list is a sample of the range and severity of federal penalties imposed for first convictions. Penalties for subsequent convictions are twice as severe.

If death or serious bodily injury result from the use of a controlled substance which has been illegally distributed, the person convicted on federal charges of distributing the substance faces mandatory life sentence and fines ranging up to $8 million.

Persons convicted on federal charges of drug trafficking within 1,000 feet of a University (21 USC 845a) face penalties of prison terms and fines which are twice as high as the regular penalties for the offense, with a mandatory prison sentence of at least 1 year.

 

Drug/Substance

Amount

Penalty - 1st Conviction

Barbiturates

Any amount

Up to 5 years prison. Fine up to $250,000

Cocaine

5 kgs. or more

Not less than 10 years prison, not more than life. Fine up to $4 million

Less than 100 grams

10-63 months prison. Fine up to $1 million

Crack Cocaine

50 grams or more

Not less than 10 years prison, not more than life. Fine up to $4 million

5-49 grams

Not less than 5 years prison, not more than 40 years. Fine up to $2 million

5 grams or less

10-63 months prison. Fine up to $1 million

Ecstasy

Any amount

Up to 20 years imprisonment. Fine up to $1 million. 3 years of supervised releases (following prison)

GHB

Any amount

Up to 20 years imprisonment. Fine up to $1 million. 3 years of supervised releases (following prison)

Hashish

10-100 kg

Up to 20 years imprisonment. Fine up to $1 million.

10 kg or less

Up to 5 years imprisonment. Fine up to $250,000

Hash Oil

1-100 kg

Up to 20 years imprisonment. Fine up to $1 million.

1 kg or less

Up to 5 years imprisonment. Fine up to $250,000

Heroin

1 kg or more

Not less than 10 years prison, not more than life. Fine up to $4 million

100-999 grams

Not less than 5 years prison, not more than 40 years. Fine up to $2 million

100 grams or less

10-63 months prison. Fine up to $1 million

Ketamine

Any amount

Up to 5 years imprisonment. Fine up to $250,000. 2 years supervised release

LSD

10 grams or more

Not less than 10 years prison, not more than life. Fine up to $4 million

1-10 grams

Not less than 5 years prison, not more than 40 years. Fine up to $2 million

Marijuana

1000 kg or more

Not less than 10 years prison, not more than life. Fine up to $4 million

100-999 kg

Not less than 5 years prison, not more than 40 years. Fine up to $2 million

50-99 kg

Up to 20 years imprisonment. Fine up to $1 million

50 kg or less

Up to 5 years imprisonment. Fine up to $250,000

Methamphetamine

50 grams or more

Not less than 10 years prison, not more than life. Fine up to $4 million

10-49 grams

Not less than 5 years prison, not more than 40 years. Fine up to $2 million

10 grams or less

10-21 months prison. Fine up to $1 million

PCP

100 grams or more

Not less than 10 years prison, not more than life. Fine up to $4 million

10-99 grams

Not less than 5 years prison, not more than 40 years. Fine up to $2 million

10 grams or less

10-21 months prison. Fine up to $1 million

Rohypnol

1 gram or more

Up to 20 years imprisonment. Fine up to $1 million

less than 30 mgs

Up to 5 years imprisonment. Fine up to $250,000

 

Federal Drug Possession Penalties (21 USC 844)

Persons convicted on Federal charges of possessing any controlled substance face penalties of up to 1 year in prison and a mandatory fine of no less than $1,000 up to a maximum of $100,000. Second convictions are punishable by not less than 15 days but not more than 2 years in prison and a minimum fine of $2,500. Subsequent convictions are punishable by not less than 90 days but not more than 3 years in prison and a minimum fine of $5,000. Possession of drug paraphernalia is punishable by a minimum fine of $750.

Special sentencing provisions for possession of crack cocaine impose a mandatory prison term of not less than 5 years but not more than 20 years and a fine up to $250,000, or both if:

  1. It is a first conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 5 grams;
  2. It is a second conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 3 grams;
  3. It is a third or subsequent crack conviction and the amount exceeds 1 gram.

Civil penalties of up to $10,000 may also be imposed for possession of small amounts of controlled substances, whether or not criminal prosecution is pursued.

 

Illinois Sanctions for Driving Under the Influence

625 Illinois Compiled Statutes 5/11-501

  1. Driving while under the influence of alcohol, other drug or drugs, intoxicating compound or compounds or any combination thereof
    1. First Conviction
      1. Minimum of one-year loss of full driving privileges
      2. Possible imprisonment for up to one year
      3. Maximum fine of $2,500
    2. Second Conviction
      1. Minimum five-year loss of full driving privileges for a second conviction in a 20-year period
      2. Mandatory five days imprisonment or 240 hours of community service
      3. Possible imprisonment for up to one year
      4. Maximum fine of $2,5000
    3. Third Conviction – Class 2 Felony
      1. Minimum ten-year loss of full driving privileges
      2. Mandatory 18-30 month periodic imprisonment
      3. Possible imprisonment for up to seven years
      4. Maximum fine of $25,000
    4. Aggravated DUI – Class 4 Felony (following a crash resulting in great bodily harm or permanent disfigurement)
      1. Minimum of one-year loss of full driving privileges
      2. Mandatory ten days imprisonment or 480 hours of community service
      3. Possible imprisonment for up to twelve years
      4. Maximum fine of $25,000
  2. Other alcohol offenses
    1. Providing alcohol to a person under age 21
      1. Possible imprisonment for up to one year
      2. Maximum fine of $2,500
    2. Illegal transportation of an alcoholic beverage
      1. Maximum fine of $1,000
      2. Point-assigned violation will be entered on drivers record
      3. Drivers license suspension for a second conviction in a 12 month period
    3. Knowingly permitting a driver under the influence to operate a vehicle
      1. Possible imprisonment for up to one year
      2. Maximum fine of $2,500
    4. Summary Suspension
      1. First offense
        1. A chemical test indication a BAC of .08 or greater results in a mandatory six-month drivers license suspension
        2. Refusal to submit to a chemical test(s) results in a twelve-month suspension
      2. Subsequent offenses
        1. A chemical test indicating a BAC of .08 or greater results in a mandatory one-year drivers license suspension
        2. Refusal to submit to a chemical test(s) results in a three-year license suspension

 

Illinois Penalties for Drinking and Driving Under Age 21

  1. Driving while under the influence of alcohol, other drug or drugs, intoxicating compound or compounds or any combination thereof
    1. First Conviction
      1. Minimum of two-year loss of full driving privileges
      2. Possible imprisonment for up to one year
      3. Maximum fine of $2,500
    2. Second Conviction
      1. Minimum five-year loss of full driving privileges for a second conviction in a 20-year period
      2. Mandatory five days imprisonment or 240 hours of community service
      3. Possible imprisonment for up to one year
      4. Maximum fine of $2,5000
    3. Third Conviction – Class 2 Felony
      1. Minimum ten-year loss of full driving privileges
      2. Mandatory 18-30 month periodic imprisonment
      3. Possible imprisonment for up to seven years
      4. Maximum fine of $25,000
    4. Aggravated DUI – Class 4 Felony (following a crash resulting in great bodily harm or permanent disfigurement)
      1. Minimum of one-year loss of full driving privileges
      2. Possible imprisonment for up to twelve years
      3. Maximum fine of $25,000
  2. Other alcohol offenses
    1. Illegal transportation of an alcoholic beverage
      1. Maximum fine of $1,000
      2. Drivers license suspended for first conviction
      3. Drivers license revoked for a second conviction
    2. Summary Suspension
      1. First offense
        1. A chemical test indication a BAC of .08 or greater results in a mandatory six-month drivers license suspension
        2. Refusal to submit to a chemical test(s) results in a twelve-month suspension
      2. Subsequent offenses
        1. A chemical test indicating a BAC of .08 or greater results in a mandatory one-year drivers license suspension
        2. Refusal to submit to a chemical test(s) results in a three-year license suspension
  1. The Zero Tolerance Law provides that minors can have their driving privileges suspended even if they're not intoxicated at the .08 level. The following table shows the length of time your driving privileges may be suspended under the Zero Tolerance Law (for BAC of .01 or greater) and DUI Laws (for BAC of .08 or greater). The loss of driving privileges is greater if you refuse to take a sobriety test.

 

Under Zero Tolerance Law

Under DUI Laws

 

 

If test refused

 

If test refused

1st violation

3 months

6 months

6 months

12 months

2nd violation

1 year

2 years

1 year

3 years

 

Effect on Driving Record

  • Zero tolerance (BAC of .01 or greater) – except during suspension period, not on public driving record as long as there is no subsequent suspension.
  • DUI conviction (BAC of .08 or greater) – Permanently on public driving record

*Under certain conditions, you may be charged with DUI even though your BAC is below .08.

Except during suspension period, violation is not on public driving record as long as there is no subsequent suspension permanently on public driving record.